The Florida school shooting was the result of law enforcement failing us  

In the aftermath of the Florida high-school shooting, “gun-control advocates mounted their hobby horses before the bodies were collected. They were sure that, this time, they would crush the NRA bogeyman and get what they wanted.”

From the New York Post:

Leave aside that what many activists wanted — confiscation of tens of millions of existing, lawful guns — is practically and legally impossible. They nonetheless dominated early media coverage because they have honed their good-vs.-evil narrative and because most of the media live in gun control’s amen corner.

Yet an odd thing happened on the way to their triumph. After a late start, a greater truth of the Florida slaughter is now dominating the discussion and setting the agenda.

This greater truth is that there were many chances to stop gunman Nikolas Cruz long before he opened fire. Equally important, the claim from some in Florida law enforcement that they are legally handcuffed until someone commits an act of violence turns out to be false.

These emerging facts are wreaking havoc with the initial simplistic narratives and are changing how Americans view the shooting and what measures they think would be more successful in preventing other massacres. In effect, the Florida story is changing before our eyes.

One result is that an early star of the gun-control faction, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel, is morphing into a villain. His department’s repeated failure to intervene in the violently downward spiral of the gunman was bad enough, but the refusal of his deputies to enter the school until the shooting stopped is a stain that Israel’s TV-ready bravado can never remove. There will be little lamenting when he loses his job.

As the nation has learned, Cruz was a well-known danger to neighbors, school officials, social workers and law enforcement. He threatened to kill classmates — in writing — and was expelled.

Yet even as his behavior grew more menacing and Broward cops visited his house dozens of times, officers believed there was nothing they could do. But as The Miami Herald detailed, they were wrong.

It cites former prosecutors who say Cruz’s threats to his classmates could be classified as aggravated cyberstalking, a felony. There is also a state law against making written threats to kill.

Moreover, being charged with aggravated cyberstalking could have cost Cruz the gun he used in the shooting. The Herald says that posting bond in Broward County on a felony charge would have required him to surrender all guns.

Read the whole thing …