The secret to a longer life? Don’t ask these dead longevity researchers  

From Gulf News:

Some of the biggest names in dieting, organic agriculture and preventive medicine died at surprisingly young ages. The wild-foods enthusiast Euell Gibbons was far ahead of his time in his advocacy of a diverse plant diet — but he died at age 64 of an aortic aneurysm. (He had been born with a genetic disorder that predisposed him to heart problems.) The nutritionist Adelle Davis helped to wake millions of people to the dangers of refined foods like white bread, but she died of cancer at 70. Nathan Pritikin, one of the foremost champions of low-fat diets, died at 69, nearly the same age as Dr Robert Atkins, who believed in the opposite regimen.

Then there is Jerome Rodale, founder of the publishing empire dedicated to health. In 1971, Dick Cavett invited Rodale onto his TV show after reading a New York Times Magazine article that called him “the guru of the organic food cult.” Rodale, 72, took his chair next to Cavett, proclaimed that he would live to be 100, and then made a snoring sound and died. (The episode never aired.)

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